The Effects of Hemophilia

Being diagnosed with hemophilia can change your lifestyle overnight. No more active sports and no more of casual tussles with friends. Life of a hemophilia patient can sometimes be challenging but it should not discourage your spirits to overcome it. Immediate effects of hemophilia can include bleeding due to minor injuries and bleeding into joints. Soft tissues and areas with thin fibrin are more prone to such bleeds and allow easy injuries.  Bleeding in joints, followed by an inflammation is another sign of hemophilia. Such internal hemorrhages can lead to permanent deformities. Site of an... Read More

Diagnosing Female Hemophilia

Hemophilia is a genetic disorder caused due to a mutation in the genes. This disorder can be inherited or can be the result of a new mutation. Hemophilia is more prevalent in men than women, since it is an X-linked recessive trait. It affects approximately 1 male in 5000. . Although statistics for the count of hemophilia in men have been tracked and documented, there are no conclusive statistics which reveal the number of women who have been affected with it. In people suffering from hemophilia, the chromosomes are deficient in blood clotting protein, which disables the blood from thickening... Read More

Hemophilia A Symptoms

Hemophilia is a genetic disorder where the blood of the individual does not coagulate during an injury. It is one of the first genetic disorders that have been discussed by ancient scholars. It is also popularly referred to as classic hemophilia. It is caused due to a deficiency or absence of blood clotting protein in the blood. Hemophilia is an X-linked recessive trait. For the disorder to surface in a child, both the X chromosomes of a girl child has to carry the trait. On the other hand for a boy child to have the disorder, he must inherit the defective X chromosome from either parent,... Read More

The Characteristics of Hemophilia

Hemophilia is the result of either a new mutation or a defected gene being passed from the parent to the child. On maximum occasions, it is an inherited disorder. The disease can be typically characterized by spontaneous bleeding and bleeding into joints. Other characteristics of hemophilia may include: Bleeding profusely Bleeding for a prolonged period Internal bleeding Getting easily injured In cases of severe hemophilia, the patient might develop a tendency to bleed in soft tissue spots recurrently. This is one of the most traceable characteristics of hemophilia. Soft tissues and areas... Read More

Hemophilia Diagnosis

In case the parents of a child are hemophilia patients, hemophilia diagnosis is done at birth by taking samples of blood from the umbilical cord to check the count of the clotting factor VIII. However, tests for hemophilia B can only be done when the child is six months or older. Post six months, blood sample is checked for factor IX which determines whether the child is suffering from hemophilia B. If parents of a child are not hemophilia parents, the hemophilia diagnosis would depend upon the severity. If severe, it is generally diagnosed early, else later in life. Severe hemophilia is also... Read More

How to Recognize Hemophilia Symptoms

Hemophilia is a genetic disorder where the blood of the individual does not coagulate during an injury. This is due to a deficiency or absence of blood clotting protein in the blood. Hemophilia is an X-linked recessive trait. This means that for the disorder to surface in a child, both the X chromosomes of a girl child has to carry the trait. On the other hand for a boy child to have the disorder, he must inherit the defective X chromosome from either parent, since men have only one X chromosome. A deficiency in factor VIII results in hemophilia A while that of factor IX results in Hemophilia... Read More